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April 28, 2008

Syria’s nuclear reactor

A nuclear reactor in Syria? Built with the help of the North Koreans? (4/25, A-1, “U.S. asserts N. Korean link to Syrian reactor.”)

Problem is that our government has lied to us so many times over the past eight years — WMDs, the economy, Social Security, “free trade,” privacy, security —that it makes it hard to believe anything it says now.

The more that someone cries wolf, the harder it is to get people to listen.

Donald Skinner
Leawood

Comments

GCYL

“I consider our oblong badge wearing friend in that way.” – solomon


“Don't get so wrapped up about someone else's opinion. It's not good for your health.” Posted by: truebluehawk | Jul 23, 2007 12:13:59 PM

You need to calm down solomon.

Engineer

solomon
The black speakers on FOX were all leaders in this or that organization or Pastors of mega churches. But you are correct in your sarcasm; I don't get much personal exposure. Most of those with whom I associate are other retired professionals. Almost all of them. like I, worked their way up out of poverty to relative affluence. They are a rather conservative group.

solomon

Engineer,

FOX and all other networks control the content that goes out. They feed you exactly what they want. I do not feel that the people you speak of are indicative of black america, they certainly are not speaking for the ones I deal with in life. I am sure a man like you has many black associates to compare these hatemongers and race hustlers to. Why don't you poll your black friends at church, social gatherings and VFW hall.

solomon

Kate,

My use of the term is not the use you have in mind. Throughout Western literature the word "ass" or "jackass" has been used to describe braying individuals. I consider our oblong badge wearing friend in that way.

Sorry if I offended anyone by calling a spade a spade. (although people say a lot worse here and are not called on it )

Kate

“Posted by: solomon | Apr 29, 2008 6:50:59 PM “

You know you had the option to just walk away instead of jumping into the gutter.

Engineer

solomon
The word "evil" may not have been said by you or them but it was certainly implied. The black preachers on FOX did make racist statements. They did exhibit ill will and feelings. This is my fault and the fault of FOX?

solomon

Engineer,

I never said evil, but it is a fact that they are rich and white.

I wonder why the the black preachers you mention are paraded on FOX. Is it because they are so powerful and relevant? My guess would be its to keep people like yourself to continue formulating biased opinions and making racial statements based on what the media(white) gives us.

Engineer

Marctnts
You just don't understand, although solomon, the Rev. Wright and the parade of black preachers on FOX do, that everything is controlled by evil, rich white men.

Marctnts

Solomon,

We'll agree to disagree on this one. I see your point about the "real" power structure behind things, but still believe (perhaps naively) that any significant action requires the backing of public opinion to avoid severe backlash on the home front.

Enjoy your evening...

solomon

GCYL,

ass

solomon

Marctnts,

I did not miss your point, but we are in disagreement on whether who or what party is in power makes any difference on our policies of war. These are decisions made by people who wield power much stronger and for longer duration than any elected official.

Marctnts

Solomon,

You completely missed the point. What I'm saying is that our ELECTED leaders make war time decisions. We vote for them (or at least we should) based upon their ability to make decisions in line with our own points of view. They are tasked with acting in what they feel is the best interest of their constituancy. This is referred to as a REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY. Our leaders are in effect acting on our collective behalf, i.e., democracy in action.

What is the alternative? Perhaps a national referendum for every decision that must be made. Should we move troops seven miles to the west, put it up for public vote. Should we advance against enemy positions on the front, another public vote. What about the thousands of bills considered by the house and senate every year? Perhaps a national weekly election (how about every Monday) where each and every one of us gets to vote on every decision, no matter how small, that must be made.

As to your question, I would submit that presidential elections during the late sixties and seventies became a referendum on the Vietnam war as much as the candidate. The same could be said for the 2006 congressional elections, as well as the 2008 presidential race. People making decision about their elected leaders based on the leaders stand on war.

Voila, democracy in action concerning war time actions.

GCYL

“Our oblong badge wearing ass of a friend here addressed my post and not the letter.” – solomon

My post has nothing to do with Engineer’s correct observation about your first post. This reminds me of another relevant observation.

Ah, the classic "I can't refute the claim. so I'll attack the person." strategy. Game over, I win. - Posted by: Kansasdog | Apr 25, 2008 2:18:45 PM

solomon

good evening marctnts,

You are entitled to your opinion but would you please point out when in our history we have started or ended a war based on what issue or person was voted for?

solomon

Good evening Engineer,

My first post here addressed the topic of both the letter writer and the front page article he commented on. In his letter he spoke to nuclear reactors in "enemy" states, the front page article spoke to nuclear reactors in "enemy" states and I voiced my opinion on nuclear reactors in "enemy" states.

Our oblong badge wearing ass of a friend here addressed my post and not the letter.

Are you guys buddies or something?

GCYL

“Not to get in the middle of your argument, but I think that you could reasonably argue that people DO have a say in wartime decisions. Our voice in these types of issues, like many in our system of government, is heard through those that we have ELECTED to their positions.” - Marctnts

Agreed. Our nation has a history of citizen input on issues of war. The most current example would be the stunning election results of 2006. Most of us didn’t get what we thought we were voting for but that’s an entirely different issue. Our list of acceptable military responses using nukes is based on constitutional need and the civilian acceptance of its use. I cringe at the thought of what the list of acceptable military responses would look like inside a dictatorship.

Engineer

solomon
You take others to task for not discussing the subject presented by the letter. This seems to be the case more often than not on these threads. But your own comment was not directed to the letter's charges. These were that the writer does not believe either that anyone was aiding Syria or that Syria even was building a reactor. You seem to be taking the view that anyone who wants should be able to build themselves a bomb and the UN's rules and regulations be damned. If that is you opinion, so be it, but that was not the subject of the letter.

Marctnts

Not to get in the middle of your argument, but I think that you could reasonably argue that people DO have a say in wartime decisions. Our voice in these types of issues, like many in our system of government, is heard through those that we have ELECTED to their positions. We we vote to put someone in a place of power, we do so knowing their positions on critical issues and grant them the responsibility to act on our behalf.

Arguing that since we don't publicly vote on every decision made during war we have no democratic process involved is equivalent to arguing that since we don't publicly vote on bills passed by congress we have no democratic process involved. In both examples, we use the democratic process of ELECTED REPRESENTATION to make the decisions, whether important or mundane, that must be made on a weekly basis.

GCYL

“but you'd rather engage in personal attacks and denunciations.” – solomon

By all means give examples. Especially in this tread since you’re throwing a little hissy fit.

“Fine, I think most people here realize you're an ass.” – solomon

“Anyone I disagree with a a hate mongering, racist, misogynistic, gay bating, God hating, facist, commie. Now, what are the issues we need to discuss?” - Posted by: jack | Apr 25, 2008 9:53:16 AM

“There is no way a population of any country has a say in when their country goes to war and what tactics are used in that war, be it a democracy, a dictatorship or monarchy.” – solomon

Your statement is seriously flawed in the reality called earth and the various forms of governments found on it. I’ll sleep at night facing counties such as Israel, England and France with their forms of government and their populace who “no way have any say in their country’s use of tactics and weapons” while you sleep at night facing North Korea and Syria with their forms of governments armed with nukes and their populace who no way have a say in their country’s use of tactics and weapons.

I find your moral equilivancy with the various forms of governments entertaining.

solomon

GCYL,

One of the things that I noticed when I came back from vacation and read 10 days of threads is that you rarely have comments on the letters written, but you'd rather engage in personal attacks and denunciations.

Fine, I think most people here realize you're an ass.

The dropping of the bombs on Japan were not decided by the people of our democracy, the war in Nam was not one that a emocracy decided on, and the current action in the Middle East is not the result of a vote by the people. There is no way a population of any country has a say in when their country goes to war and what tactics are used in that war, be it a democracy, a dictatorship or monarchy.

 
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