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June 07, 2008

Obesity and bureaucracy

The CDC’s findings in a recent Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) fly in the face of almost a decade of threats by obesity activists (5/28, A-1, “Child obesity’s steady rate continues to give pause”). The agency’s research demonstrates that childhood obesity rates haven’t increased since 1999.

During that time, a handful of “experts” have likened weight gain to terrorist threats, global warming and other equally calamitous scenarios. But statistics of “skyrocketing” rates of obesity among our kids only serve as justification for the increasingly intrusive government regulations sought by activist groups and overeager health officials. This research quiets those shrill and unfounded claims.

Clearly parents, schools and businesses have all taken it upon themselves to make sure our children get enough physical activity and a balanced diet.

Though these findings demonstrate that it doesn’t take obtrusive government policies to curb children’s weight, longtime obesity activist David Ludwig, who wrote an editorial accompanying the JAMA study, is still arguing that these results prove the need for more bureaucratic intervention.

It seems that no matter the news, good or bad, there will always be opportunists willing to leverage our kids’ health as an excuse to meddle in our lives.

Trice Whitefield
Senior research analyst, Center for Consumer Freedom
Washington

Comments

katman

That's okay, as long as it's not when you look in the mirror.

Stifled Freedom

I still see a lot of fat kids.

NoMoreMrNiceGuy

Or addiction to anything for that matter, sports fanaticism, gambling, sex, frivolous spending, bling, consumerism as a whole.

I am pointing out that just because someone has tattoos does not make them of any lesser character or standing. I tend to distrust suits more than tats. Smiley, phony, with outstanding oratory skills.....sound familiar? I can think of a couple that are simply 100% untrust worthy.
Hint: Both are lawyers, millionaires and habitual liars.

katman

Bad guy, interesting method of posting -- repition for emphasis. RE: tattoos, I'm not speaking of a tramp stamp or a vet with a subtle tattoo. I'm referring to the proliferation of tattoos that scream 'I collect tattoos'.

Of course, there is some hereditary obesity but those genes don't seem to be as present in other countries of the world. I fight my weight every day -- and I crave BBQ. I believe the addiction to food in our culture is as strong as addiction to drugs, alcohol, & tobacco -- and is every bit as difficult to overcome.

I would consider posting this 2-3 times but perhaps another time.

NoMoreMrNiceGuy

Katman I somewhat agree however, tattoos are not disrespectful of your body. That is simply your opinion. It appears that you believe the superficial shell is more important than a persons character. There are a many suit wearing, geek looking yuppies that are criminal on their souls and may biker looking, tatoo toting individuals with hearts of gold.
What about a combat vet that has a tattoo, laid his life down for you and everyone else, you gotta problem with him? Obesity that is brought on from over eating, I agree with. Some people however, face heriditary obesity and there is no super program that will make them a model.

NoMoreMrNiceGuy

Katman I somewhat agree however, tattoos are not disrespectful of your body. That is simply your opinion. It appears that you believe the superficial shell is more important than a persons character. There are a many suit wearing, geek looking yuppies that are criminal on their souls and may biker looking, tatoo toting individuals with hearts of gold.
What about a combat vet that has a tattoo, laid his life down for you and everyone else, you gotta problem with him? Obesity that is brought on from over eating, I agree with. Some people however, face heriditary obesity and there is no super program that will make them a model.

katman

I have a confession to make. Two things I do not deal with very well are: obesity & tattoos. Both demonstrate an lack of respect for one's body & physical appearance. I understand why others feel differently. 'That's what makes horse races'.

If you were to travel to almost any other place in the world, you would not see obesity on the scale we have here. Obesity equals the sacrifice of many years from one's life. It's a national health problem that requires the personal involvement of all of us. I would add by saying to those who choose to proliferate tattoos while young, you are limiting you future social and economic potential.

 
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