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July 01, 2008

Where’s outrage over wiretapping?

I see once again our Constitution is under attack in the form of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 2008, and the assault goes underreported by our “free press” and unnoticed by the public (6/20, A-2, “Wiretapping bill rewritten”). Sen. Kit Bond has led the charge with his compromise legislation that would vastly expand the Bush administration’s powers to spy on the American people while at the same time granting immunity to the telecommunications industry.

What is most disturbing, however, is the lockstep support this legislation has received by both the Kansas and Missouri Democratic delegations. Even Reps. Emanuel Cleaver and Nancy Boyda, who have been supportive of civil liberties in the past, have chosen to betray their oath of office and collaborate with the likes of House Republican leader John Boehner and Rep. Roy Blunt.

This legislation is headed to the Senate with the aid of Majority Leader Harry Reid and is very likely to pass. Let us watch and see if our new agent of change, Sen. Barack Obama, will use his power as the presumptive Democratic nominee and stop this outrage.

I’m not optimistic.

Frank. M. Hendricks
Kansas City

If we start down the slippery slope of retroactively granting immunity for breaking the law in the instance of illegal wiretapping, just where is it going to end?

The criminals who have been running this nation like emperors for the last 761/27 years need to be held accountable.

David Oberdorfer
Bonner Springs

Comments

Q2D2

Engineer: You don't grant immunity to someone who DIDN'T break the law!

The telco's did. On authorization from Cheney & Dubya.

eukaryote

Yeah because we all know that Bush and his henchmen would never break any laws. We need to just trust the Leader and forget about liberal niceties like the fourth amendment.

Engineer

Q2D2
It is not a question of a law being broken; it is just a prohibition of nuisance law suits. To collect damages you must show financial harm. The ACLU could have tied up courts and gotten a lot of publicity but could you demonstrate how they could have shown any financial harm to anyone in this matter? We are all safer now that questions have been cleared up; questions that even left wing Congress people were able to understand.

Q2D2

And, Gary, it's not the FISA courts that are the problem. It's the RETROACTIVE IMMUNITY for the telecom companies that broke the law.

Q2D2

Even Dennis Moore has been bought and paid for.

Face it... we're screwed.

Gary

There should be no outrage over renewal of the FISA protections. It is a necessary component of national security.

NoMoreMrNiceGuy

Read this report and talk about outrage, you know what is being done? Nothing. Gov. Blunt is hiding like the coward he is, probably related to Dick Cheney.

http://www.auditor.mo.gov/press/2007-59.pdf

NoMoreMrNiceGuy

Civil liberties? You mean violations of the Constitution via the Bradley Amendment? You want bad this is as bad as it gets, fraud, deceit, theft, slander.

As for wire tapping, I invite the Feds to listen in, maybe they will start to be more in touch with common constituents.

http://www.auditor.mo.gov/press/2007-59.htm

 
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