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August 01, 2008

Questions about evolution

The editorial of 7/24 (Opinion, “Top GOP choice for Kansas school board”) expresses a desire to avoid the embarrassment that would follow if the folks in northeast Johnson County were to select the wrong candidate for the state Board of Education.

The primary issue is evolution. I am not proposing the teaching of any viewpoint. I am proposing that students and parents be permitted to question what is being taught. We are told that it all started with a big bang. Why should parents and students not be permitted to ask questions such as:

What was it that went “bang?”

Where did it come from?

Where did the energy that caused the explosion some from?

How did life come forth from that which had no life?

How did the life forms make the change to sexual reproduction?

Is evolution a faith-based theory?

Is a person stupid for asking these questions?

David F. Robinson
Overland Park

Comments

GCYL

“No issues regarding questions in the public schools I attended, nor the public schools my children attend. Now, the catholic school I attended is a different story.” - tomw

While my personal experience never included catholic schools, my experience has been the complete opposite of yours. Public schools identified the “trouble makers” by their questions. Private schools welcomed the challenge.

I was amazed that there actually exists an education to be had outside of institutionalized monopolies where question were only allowed on the approved subject matter that was being taught inside the approved class.

tomw

"It would be better if evolution were taught - along with the most relevant questions to its validity."

And what exactly would those questions be?

Perhaps we could have 3rd graders questioning math theory, too.

"Since “asking questions” are not allowed to be taught at public schools, the answer to your question is yes."

No issues regarding questions in the public schools I attended, nor the public schools my children attend. Now, the catholic school I attended is a different story.

GCYL

“more than a few, encourage questions.” - tomw

On the list of approved materials and somehow that makes you believe your position on the issue is superior.

“It would be better if evolution were taught - along with the most relevant questions to its validity. Neither God, nor I.D. need be mentioned at all.” - JUNGLEJACK

Agreed. The amount of fear shown in this thread about being asked questions and defending a scientific theory is sad.

tomw

" I am proposing that students and parents be permitted to question what is being taught."

What I find interesting about this letter is that is based on a false premise. All the science classrooms I have attended, more than a few, encourage questions.

JUNGLEJACK

What I like about this letter is the fact that the writer doesn't mention the teaching of I.D.

It is not enough that students be allowed to ask questions - as most likely don't have it in them to muster up enough interest to care to ask. It would be better if evolution were taught - along with the most relevant questions to its validity. Neither God, nor I.D. need be mentioned at all.

tomw

"What was it that went “bang?”

Where did it come from?

Where did the energy that caused the explosion some from?"

Sorry, that's not a part of evololution theory.

"How did life come forth from that which had no life?

How did the life forms make the change to sexual reproduction?"

Any number of books, papers and websites that explain the prevailing theories.

"Is evolution a faith-based theory?'
No.

"Is a person stupid for asking these questions?'
No, but if you are truly looking for answers, a letter to the paper is not the best place to ask.

anonymousposter

"Since 'asking questions' are not allowed to be taught at public schools..."

Huh?!? No one is preventing anyone from asking questions. Teachers simply can't teach religion in science class in public schools. You can teach religion all you want in churches and in your home.

dolcemusica1

Such ignorance. People really don't get it. Of course, students can ask questions. There may or may not be answers depending on the question asked.

The ISSUE IS: Intelligent Design is a philosophical theory that should in a philosophy class and evolution is a scientific theory that should be taught in a science class. PERIOD!!!!!

Unfortunately, we have had some rather ignorant members on the Board of Education that don't know the difference between philosophy and science. I wonder if they know the difference between English and Math, or maybe History and Music class. It's the same concept.

If you don't understand the differences in the various classes (i.e., philosophy, science, math, english, etc), I strongly suggest you go back to school so your blatant ignorance isn't showing.

NoMoreMrNiceGuy

YOu can ask questions in public education, you best not ask question in a Jesuit or Christian based environment, they will scald you and call you a heathen.
There are many questions that come to mind about religion and "faith".
How come if you fall from a 12 story building and pray, gravity trumps faith?
How do we know for a fact that Jesus was white and a Republican?

GCYL

“Is anyone preventing parents and students from asking questions?” - anonymousposter

Since “asking questions” are not allowed to be taught at public schools, the answer to your question is yes.

Otherwise I’d say what’s wrong with presenting alternatives to the theory of evolution? What better way to learn than being allowed to ask questions?

anonymousposter

Is anyone preventing parents and students from asking questions?

 
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